Port Townsend

Port Townsend is a big city that never happened. Poised in the late 1800s to be what Seattle eventually became, it stayed a distinctively Victorian city when the main railroad link to the East headed North from Olympia along the East shore of Puget Sound, leaving Port Townsend far out of the way on the West shore. Lucky us.

 

 

Grand buildings were constructed in anticipation of the bright future in store when the railroad that eventually never came would bring prosperity and new growth to the seaport. These buildings survived as the town`s population leveled out after the turn of the century. The closing of near by Fort Worden after WWII further isolated the town, with little employment available that could support a family. The entire downtown area is now protected as a National Historic District so that the charm we enjoy today will also be here tomorrow.

 


 

Once one of the busiest seaports along the West Coast, Port Townsend is a place where time slowed down. It became a treasure of Victorian architecture and history. This is one of those rare places that has a truly magic feeling. From here boats leave daily for the near by San Juan Islands. Whidby Island is a short car ferry ride across the Sound from downtown.  The mountains and forest are a short distance away.

 

 

Forest Gems and my Pike Market woodcraft stall have allowed Susan and I to aquire over 70 acres of forest land in both Kitsap and Jefferson County, some with old growth habitat.  We know of no better way to honor the beauty of this region than to set aside and protect whatever parts of it we can. Even if you can`t live in the shadow of the Olympics, or protect an old growth cedar, maple or fir, you can own a piece of quality regional art that will give a room or corner of your home a true Northwest feeling.